Chris Dalglish

My formal interest in landscape developed while studying archaeology at the University of Glasgow (graduated 1997).  Glasgow has a tradition of combining archaeology and historical geography: the archaeology department emerged from the geography department in the 1960s and 1970s.  Studying in this environment, I soon developed an interest in the history of farming landscapes and my PhD (Glasgow, 2001) looked at the development of several parishes in the southern Scottish Highlands.  I studied the social and economic changes which were taking place there as the modern world emerged from the medieval, with a particular concern for the changing routines and practices of farming life.  These topics remain of great interest to me.

After completing my PhD, I left academia to work as a professional archaeologist and heritage manager, spending short periods of time as a freelance archaeologist and working for the Scottish Government heritage agency Historic Scotland before taking a post with Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD).  Amongst other things, my work with GUARD included Environmental Impact Assessments where I was tasked with assessing development impacts on the ‘setting’ of archaeological sites and monuments, in landscape and visual terms.  Through this work I came to understand the importance of taking a collaborative approach to landscape research and practice.

In 2007, I took up my current post as a lecturer in archaeology at the University of Glasgow.  My current research draws on my academic background in landscape archaeology and historical geography and also on my previous career as a professional archaeologist.  My interests centre on landscape and heritage policy and practice and particularly on the question: how can engagement with the past landscape contribute to the creation of positive, more just landscapes in the present and future?  I am interested in exploring how this contribution can be delivered through particular kinds of governance, practice and action.

I was appointed as a Director of Landscape Research Group in 2012 and serve as the LRG’s Research and Policy coordinator.

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